Tragic Tipstaff Death in Phoenix Park, 1905

From the Irish News and Belfast Morning News, 9 June 1905, this sad account of the death of Mr Robert Pierson, tipstaff/crier to the Recorder of Dublin: “Yesterday at the Dublin City Commission, before the Lord Chief Justice and a jury, James Doolan, publican, Watling Street, was charged with the manslaughter of Robert Pierson, who…

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The Registrar who Knew Joyce, 1937

From the Irish Press, 19 October 1937 (photo above): “The ceremony of opening the new revolving doors at the Chancery Place entrance to the High Court was performed by Mr CP Curran, Senior Registrar, in the absence of the Master of the High Court yesterday. The doors are the first of the kind to be…

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A Mysterious Assault on a Four Courts Registrar, 1916

From the Belfast Newsletter, June 16, 1916: “FOUR COURTS OFFICIAL INJURED STRANGE AFFAIR AT BLACKROCK A sensational and mysterious assault is reported from Blackrock, County Dublin, the victim being Mr Francis Kennedy, Associate of the King’s Bench, and nephew of the Lord Chief Justice. It appears that in the early hours of the morning, Mr…

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Son of Court 2 Housekeeper Kills Son of Court 3 Housekeeper in 22 Rounds at Bully’s Acre, 1816

From the Belfast Commercial Chronicle Dublin 2 May, 1816: “On Tuesday evening, two young men of the names of John Goold and Michael White, had a regular pitched battle in the field near the Military Road, which terminated, after two-and-twenty rounds, by blow given by the latter to the stomach of the former, which put…

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The Disappearance of an Official Assignee, 1885

From the Freeman’s Journal, 2 June 1885: “The prolonged absence from duty of a prominent official connected with an important department in the Four Courts has given rise to rumors more or less compromising… the official in question more than three weeks ago obtained leave of absence on account of ill-health, that he repaired to…

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A Redundant Crier, 1900

From the Irish Times, 19 December 1900 “Yesterday in the Queen’s Bench Division… the case of Cooper v the Queen came on for argument… the question raised was whether the supplicant, who was crier or tipstaff of the Court of Bankruptcy, appointed by the late Judge Millar, had a permanent office, and was entitled to…

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Fighting over Girls in the Yard, 1836

From the Dublin Morning Register, 20 December 1836: “Garret Moran and James Doolin, two nice-looking young lads, were next brought up, charged with drunkenness and disturbing the peace. The watchman stated that he found them fighting in the yard of the Four Courts. Moran declared that he had a situation there, and could go in…

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The Terrifying Tale of the Tipstaff’s Niece, 1835

The following story worthy of Dickens, or perhaps Wilkie Collins, was reported in the Dublin Morning Register, 4 September 1835, and the Leeds Times, 19 September 1835: “[Margaret Feltis], who is only 17 years of age, was left an orphan, and taken [in} by her uncle… a man of excellent character, of the name of…

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Court Documents Stolen for Possible Sale as Toilet Paper, 1860

From the Evening Freeman, 27 February 1860: “Bessie Birmingham… employed for sweeping a portion of the offices at the Four Courts, Matthew Campbell and Philip Keely were brought up in custody… charged with having stolen and sold a number of valuable parchment and paper documents from one of the offices of the Court of Exchequer……

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