Teenager Hoaxes Thirteen Belfast Solicitors, 1925

From the Weekly Telegraph, September 5, 1925: “Unlucky Thirteen – Belfast Solicitors Hoaxed An extraordinary hoax has been carried out on at least thirteen Belfast solicitors, as a result of which a person about whom the police are now enquiring, is believed to be richer to the extent of about £220. The ruse to obtain…

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No False Telegram, 1928

From the Nottingham Journal, 11 September 1928: ‘An Irish solicitor, Mr NC Caruth, of Ballymona (Co Antrim) left a curious request in his will just proved. He directed that if any of his sons were abroad at the time of his death no false telegram shall be sent announcing his death, but his wife should…

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Solicitor Delays Discovery to Protect Morals of Lady Typists, 1906

From the Mail, 15 August 1906: “DUBLIN SOLICITOR AND HIS LADY TYPISTS In the Probate and Matrimonial Division, today, in the case of Fitzgerald v Fitzgerald, known as the Waterford matrimonial case, Mr Rice applied on behalf of the male petitioner for an order directing Mr Shannon, the solicitor on the other side, to give…

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Apprentice Solicitor Swordfight on Eve of Qualification, 1717

A very early Irish legal story, from Pue’s Occurrences, 31 January 1719:   “About 3 quarters after 2 in the Afternoon, Mr Leigh, eldest Son of Richard Leigh Esq of the County of Westmeath, and one Mr Smith, Son to Mr Smith, at the Sun near Smithfield (who served his Time to an Attorney, and was…

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Irish Solicitor Efficiently Rescued After Falling Off Dublin-Holyhead Ferry mid-Channel, 1932

From the Belfast Telegraph, 26 October 1932: “Passengers on the RMS Scotia from Dun Laoghaire (Kingstown) to Holyhead on Tuesday night witnessed the rescue of an Irish solicitor, Mr O’Connor.  It appears that somewhere about mid-channel he fell overboard.  The ship was stopped and one of the lifeboats lowered, and after a time Mr O’Connor…

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Breach of Promise Proceedings by Smitten Solicitor’s Clerk, 1892

From the Freeman’s Journal, 9 January 1892: “A DUBLIN BREACH OF PROMISE CASE Yesterday Master Pigott sat in the Master’s office to hear a case of Lee v Doyle.  The defendant, describing himself as Richard Lee, solicitor’s assistant, 17 Walton Terrace, Drumcondra Park Upper, sued Miss Marion Doyle, 15 Kenmare Park, spinster, to recover £100…

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Popular Killarney Solicitor Disappears after Derby Win, Turns Up Decades Later in South Africa, 1886-1906

From the Kerry Evening Post, 19 June 1886: “The public who are conversant with the facts of the sudden and mysterious disappearance in London of Mr Alfred M Bernard, Solicitor, of Sheheree, near Killarney, where he was on official business, entertain the gravest apprehension that he met with foul play, and, indeed, everything surrounding the…

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The Wimple Life, 1908

From the Preston Herald, 22 August 1908: “Unless the widow of Mr Michael J Hanmore, a solicitor, late of 3, Prince of Wales Terrace, Bray, Co Wicklow, consents to enter a convent and devote the remainder of her life to prayer. His executors are instructed that she is to receive her jewellery and wearing apparel…

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If Cats Could Talk: The Fatal Fall of a Donegal Solicitor, 1916

From the Evening Herald, 7 September 1916: “Solicitor’s Claim for Alleged Slander etc Today, before Mr Justice Gordon, sitting as Vacation Judge, the case of John Mackey v the Four Courts Hotel Co Ltd, and Henry G Kilbey, managing director, was listed for hearing. The plaintiff sought damages laid at £10,000 for slander, false imprisonment,…

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Lady Law Clerks Strike Out, 1920

From the Irish Examiner, 3 June, 1920 “The Law Clerks, who are on strike, and a number of their colleagues, who joined with them in sympathy, made a remarkable demonstration at the Four Courts today, on the occasion of the resumption of business there on the opening of Trinity Term.  At about 10 o’clock, to…

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Law Student Shoots Solicitor, Barrister Touts for Defence Brief, 1926

From the Londonderry Sentinel, 3 June 1926: “A shocking crime was committed in Dublin on Tuesday night as a result of which Daniel Joseph Gleeson, a law student, giving an address in Clonliffe Road, has been arrested on a charge of murder. Shortly after seven p.m. it is alleged that Gleeson entered the office of…

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Solicitor Restrained from Breaking Through Judicial Procession Sues for Assault, 1898

From the Weekly Nation, 30 April 1898: “Constable 141A was summoned [for assault] by Mr Alfred MacDermott, solicitor. Mr McDermott said he was crossing under the covered passage at the coffee room door of the Four Courts [when he got] a blow across the chest from the defendant… he was seized from behind by the…

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Solicitor Caned in Four Courts Yard Over Missed Deed, 1846

From the Dublin Evening Post, 26 November 1846: “Mr Richard Hackett, solicitor, summoned Mr Michael Hackett, also solicitor, for assault. The complainant gave evidence that he was in the yard of the Four Courts [when] the defendant, in passing by, asked him to return him a deed. The complainant replied that the deed was not…

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Acid Attack on Solicitor Charged with Indecent Assault, 1884

From the Belfast News-Letter, 14 March 1884: “Miss Lillie Tyndall, a young lady of prepossessing appearance, the daughter of a well-to-do farmer outside Arklow [was] charged with having thrown a bottle of… vitriol into the face of [Mr John Kelly Toomey, a well-known solicitor]. [Information sworn by Mr Toomey, from hospital] Lillie Tyndall came to…

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Gallant Liffey Rescue by Solicitor, 1872

From the Freeman’s Journal, 12 August 1872: “At about 3 o’clock on Saturday afternoon a man, who apparently was under the influence of drink, leaped across the boundary wall into the Liffey, nearly opposite the Four Courts. His position was extremely perilous as the tide was pretty full, and it seemed clear that unless prompt…

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Lawyer Relieved of Silk Handkerchief by Female Cutpurses, 1818

From the Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser, 7 March 1818 “A few days since, a Professional Gentleman, on his return from the Four Courts, was accosted in D’Olier Street, Dublin, by two females, who said “Sir, some dirty people have put filth upon your coat,” and offered very obligingly to remove it with their handkerchiefs,…

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Whacksation of Costs, 1848

From the Cork Examiner, 14 June 1848: “A fracas took place yesterday morning in the Four Courts between two professional gentlemen. The circumstance caused a good deal of conversation during the day. The facts appeared as follows:- A solicitor of eminence lately had a medical gentleman as a client. The latter some time since left…

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A Shortened Period of Apprenticeship, 1836

In the Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent, 3 November 1836, we find an account of a young man’s application to be admitted as a solicitor despite having served less than the standard five years’ apprenticeship: “COURT OF EXCHEQUER [today’s Court 3]: Mr Jackson KC applied on behalf of Henry Merrick, praying that he be admitted…

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Solicitors Meet to Discuss the General Impossibility of Barristers, 1843

From the Freeman’s Journal, 29 November 1843, this account of an early Solicitors’ Society meeting: “The secretary read the… steps that had been taken [to prevent] the inconvenience of the solicitors being required by the bar to convey books from the Law Library… [T]he committee had written to Mr Dixon, father of the Bar, to…

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Long Hours for Law Clerks, 1865

From the Freeman’s Journal, 13 May 1865: “The general half-year meeting of the Attorneys and Solicitors’ Society was held yesterday in the Solicitors Hall, Four Courts [now the Law Library]… to consider the propriety of giving a half-holiday each Saturday to their employees. Mr Molloy observed that the early closing movement had been carried out…

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Solicitor’s Spouse Springs Prisoner from the Marshalsea, 1850

If you were to find yourself in a 19th century Victorian cab, driving through Dublin, where would you direct the driver to go? The Four Courts of course! Be careful, though, to check your pocket for your fare, or you might end up at the other Four Courts – the Four Courts Marshalsea – where…

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