Compliments from a Four Courts’ Prisoner, 1916

From the Irish Independent, 15 May 1916: “A FOUR COURTS PRISONER Captain RK Brereton, JP, Ladywell, Athlone, relating his experiences in Dublin during the rising, states that he motored through the Phoenix Park on Easter Monday evening, and was taken prisoner by the Sinn Feiners at a barricade near the Four Courts, being informed that…

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Irish Woman Barrister Secures Acquittal for Client on Murder Charge, 1931

From the Waterford Standard, 14 March 1931: “LADY BARRISTER WINS HER FIRST MURDER CASE When she defended Mary Ellen Farrelly, Goiley, Fordstown, Kells, at the Central Criminal Court, Dublin, this week, Miss K Phelan BL won the first murder case in which she had pleaded. Farrelly was charged with the murder of her infant son,…

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Son of Court 2 Housekeeper Kills Son of Court 3 Housekeeper in 22 Rounds at Bully’s Acre, 1816

From the Belfast Commercial Chronicle Dublin 2 May, 1816: “On Tuesday evening, two young men of the names of John Goold and Michael White, had a regular pitched battle in the field near the Military Road, which terminated, after two-and-twenty rounds, by blow given by the latter to the stomach of the former, which put…

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Barrister Rescues Sheep, Sued by its Owner, 1907

From the Northern Whig, 29 October 1907 “It is not the first time that trop de zele has brought trouble upon honest people.  The eagerness of Mr Robert Doyle, a member of the Irish Bar, in the cause of prevention of cruelty to animals, made him a defendant in an action for damages in the…

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The Prime of Miss Averil Deverell, 1937

All members of the Irish Bar know of Averil Deverell, whose enigmatic representation in oils smiles down, Brodie-like, from the wall of the Four Courts Law Library. Miss Deverell holds the distinction of being not only the first practising woman barrister in Southern Ireland but also one of the first (possibly the only?) set of…

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Plumber’s Assistant Dies in Bankruptcy Court Explosion, 1888

From the Dublin Daily Express, 24 January 1888: “TERRIFIC GAS EXPLOSION AT THE FOUR COURTS – ONE LIFE LOST About half-past three o’clock yesterday afternoon, a terrific gas explosion occurred in the Bankruptcy Buildings of the Four Courts, and resulted in the death of one lad, the injury of two other persons, and the destruction…

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Barrister Goes on Fire in Ballina Circuit Court, 1934

From the Meath Chronicle, 24 November 1934: “BARRISTER ON FIRE IN COURT Mr Connolly, a barrister, was addressing Judge Wyse-Power in Ballina (Co Mayo) Circuit Court, when his gown came in contact with an electric fire and blazed up. A solicitor dashed forward and put out the flames after a good part of the gown…

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A Four Courts Hold-Up, 1920

From the Irish Examiner, 2 December 1920: “FOUR COURTS SCARE – BARRISTERS HELD UP Our Dublin Correspondent wired last night.  Shortly before 4 o’clock this afternoon a sensation was caused at the Four Courts by the arrival of a party of Auxiliary Police wearing tam-o-shanters.  They came in motors and scattered all over the buildings,…

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Along for the Ride, Pre-Railway

From the Connaught Telegraph, 14 March 1914, this interesting account of the periodic sittings of the Courts of Assizes, which, until their abolition in 1924, had jurisdiction outside Dublin over the most serious criminal offences: “The arrival of the train by which their lordships and the members of the circuit travel in modern times, is always…

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Lady Law Clerks Strike Out, 1920

From the Irish Examiner, 3 June, 1920 “The Law Clerks, who are on strike, and a number of their colleagues, who joined with them in sympathy, made a remarkable demonstration at the Four Courts today, on the occasion of the resumption of business there on the opening of Trinity Term.  At about 10 o’clock, to…

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Dressed to Kilt, 1930

From the Irish Examiner, January 21, 1930: “A touch of novelty was given to the ceremony of calling a number of young gentlemen to the Bar in the Supreme Court this morning.  One of them appeared in kilts.  The regulation wig and gown did not harmonise with this costume, and an old Brehon might have…

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The Elephant in the Yard, 1906

From the Irish Examiner, 6 March 1906: “The Rolls Court, under ordinary circumstances a prosaic place where nothing but heavy legal arguments about Chancery suits are heard, was today a scene of some interest. The court was thronged by members of the public, theatrical gentlemen, and barristers for the hearing of the application of the…

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The Disappearance of an Official Assignee, 1885

From the Freeman’s Journal, 2 June 1885: “The prolonged absence from duty of a prominent official connected with an important department in the Four Courts has given rise to rumors more or less compromising… the official in question more than three weeks ago obtained leave of absence on account of ill-health, that he repaired to…

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The New Law Library, 1895

From the Dublin Evening Telegraph, 10 August 1895: “[T]he new bar library at the Four Courts is rapidly approaching completion.  Only those who have had occasion to visit it can have any idea of the wretched character of the apartment in which the members of the bar have hitherto had to make up their cases… …

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Barrister Shoots Himself While Practising for Lawyers’ Corps, 1803

From the Dublin Journal, 22 March 1803: “Died on Friday last, at Montpelier Place, near the Black Rock, James Sweetman Esq, Barrister at Law. His death was occasioned by an unhappy accident; he was in the Lawyers Corps, and though in a weak state of health, had determined to resume his arms upon the present…

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A Redundant Crier, 1900

From the Irish Times, 19 December 1900 “Yesterday in the Queen’s Bench Division… the case of Cooper v the Queen came on for argument… the question raised was whether the supplicant, who was crier or tipstaff of the Court of Bankruptcy, appointed by the late Judge Millar, had a permanent office, and was entitled to…

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Law Student Shoots Solicitor, Barrister Touts for Defence Brief, 1926

From the Londonderry Sentinel, 3 June 1926: “A shocking crime was committed in Dublin on Tuesday night as a result of which Daniel Joseph Gleeson, a law student, giving an address in Clonliffe Road, has been arrested on a charge of murder. Shortly after seven p.m. it is alleged that Gleeson entered the office of…

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A Strange Bequest, 1913

From the Aberdeen Daily Journal, 23 September 1913: “Mr William Green, of Gardiner’s Place, Dublin, barrister, for some time editor of the Authorised Law Reports, left personal estate in the United Kingdom valued at £1059. The testator bequeathed £100, his books, pictures and medals, and a little wax doll in blue silk dress to his…

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A Barrister’s Johnnie, 1924

From the Evening Herald, 7 March 1924: “At the Sessions today, before the Recorder, Mr Alex Lynn, BL, sued Mr Richard Mulcahy, as Minister of Defence, and Major General Guilfoyle for damages for loss of a wig and gown and a brief bag and contents alleged to have been seized by military forces at 23…

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